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JPMorgan Chase Art Collection

The JPMorgan Chase Art Collection began in 1959 when David Rockefeller, then president of The Chase Manhattan Bank, established the firm’s art program and took the lead in the field of corporate art collecting. 

 By integrating artwork with the architecture of new buildings and incorporating an enlightened approach to acquisitions, this forerunner of corporate collections became a model for other companies worldwide.

 

 

Today it is one of the oldest and largest corporate art collections in the world, focusing on modern and contemporary painting, sculpture, works on paper and photography, which continue to be the portfolio's strength. This core collection is enhanced by a diverse and eclectic range of objects from every country in which JPMorgan Chase does business, offering a unique perspective on the firm’s culture.

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Mickalene Thomas (American, born 1971)

Afro Goddess Ex Lover’s Friend, 2006

Mickalene Thomas (American, born 1971)

Afro Goddess Ex Lover’s Friend, 2006

C-print
39 ½ × 49 ½ inches (100.3 × 125.7 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
© 2017 Mickalene Thomas, Courtesy Yancey Richardson Gallery

Mickalene Thomas explores gender, identity, and representations of women in Western art history and pop culture. Her subjects are often powerful black female figures – including her friends, family and celebrities – in elaborate settings constructed by the artist.

Romare Bearden (American, 1912 – 1988)

Interior with Profiles, 1969

Romare Bearden (American, 1912 – 1988)

Interior with Profiles, 1969

Collage on board
39 ¾ x 49 7/8 inches (101 x 126.7 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
Art © Romare Bearden Foundation Inc/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

One of the most important American artists of the 20th century, Romare Bearden expanded the power of collage as a contemporary art form and elevated aspects of black culture and daily community life during the Harlem Renaissance. Bearden’s work continues to be a significant influence on many artists working today.

Chuck Close (American, born 1940)

Phil / Fingerprint, 1980

Chuck Close (American, born 1940)

Phil / Fingerprint, 1980

Ink on paper
93 x 69 ½ inches (236.2 x 176.5 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
© Chuck Close, Courtesy Pace Gallery

Chuck Close is best known for his large scale detailed portraits rendered in paint, photography, ink, graphite, collage or textile. Phil/Fingerprint is a portrait of American avant-garde composer Philip Glass, made of thousands of individual stamped transfers of Close’s fingerprint to paper.

Hayal Pozanti (Turkish, born 1983)
The World in Voice-Over, 2012

Hayal Pozanti (Turkish, born 1983)
The World in Voice-Over, 2012

Acrylic on panel
73 x 47 inches (185.4 x 119.4 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery

Hayal Pozanti explores human relationships with technology through vibrant and geometric shapes that represent her own unique alphabet informed and organized by assigned data. Her practice explores the possibilities of a universal language that transcends boundaries.

Ana Mendieta (American, born Cuba, 1948 – 1985)
Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico, 1976 (Estate print 1991)

Ana Mendieta (American, born Cuba, 1948 – 1985)
Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico, 1976 (Estate print 1991)

From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973 – 1977
Color photograph from a suite of 12 13 ¼ x 20 inches (33.7 x 50.8 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
© The Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection, L.L.C., Courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co.

Envisioning the female body as a primal origin of life, Ana Mendieta used her physical form in performances and installations interacting with nature. Documented in her Silueta series, Mendieta invoked the transience of life and cycles of renewal in the context of Mexican landscapes. There are more than 6,000 photographs in the JPMorgan Chase Art Collection.

Ramiro Gomez (American, born 1986)
Jardin #2, 2015

Ramiro Gomez (American, born 1986)
Jardin #2, 2015

Oil stick and acrylic on panel
40 ½ × 36 ½ inches (102.9 × 92.7 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles

Ramiro Gomez shifts immigrant laborers into the foreground of his paintings that unveil the often invisible custodians, housekeepers, and gardeners caring for the affluent neighborhoods of Los Angeles. Gomez’s work explores political and social themes that are central to his experience as a member of the Chicano community.

Nam June Paik (South Korean, 1932 – 2006)
Rosetta Stone, Channel 10, 1983

Nam June Paik (South Korean, 1932 – 2006)
Rosetta Stone, Channel 10, 1983

Oil on canvas and TV facing
31 x 42 ½ x 6 ¼ inches (78.7 x 108 x 15.9 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
© Nam June Paik Estate

Founder of video art, Nam June Paik made the relationship between technology and art the primary focus of his work. Rosetta Stone, Channel 10 is like a relic of the distant past, offering a clue to the origins of our technological age. The JPMorgan Chase Art Collection commissioned one of Paik’s largest video installations, Chase Video Matrix, a sculpture comprised of 429 stacked television monitors.

Betty Parsons (American, 1900 – 1982)
Wheel of Fun, 1970

Betty Parsons (American, 1900 – 1982)
Wheel of Fun, 1970

Paint on found wood
22 x 22 x 2 inches (55.9 x 55.9 x 5.1 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
© 2017 Betty Parsons Foundation

Legendary art gallerist Betty Parsons launched the careers of leading artists in post-World War II American art including Agnes Martin, Jasper Johns, and Robert Rauschenberg. Parsons was also an artist herself, creating whimsical yet sophisticated constructions with wood found along the shore near her home on Long Island, New York.

Andrew Holmquist (American, born 1985)
Bathers, 2016

Andrew Holmquist (American, born 1985)
Bathers, 2016

Oil and acrylic on canvas
78 ¾ × 94 ½ inches (200 × 240 centimeters)
Courtesy of the artist and Carrie Secrist Gallery

A multiplicity of sources taken from philosophy, animated cartoons, the LGBTQ community and personal stories inform the visionary paintings of emerging Chicago-based artist, Andrew Holmquist. In Bathers, Holmquist updates a well-known art historical subject in an exuberant summertime scene populated male figures instead of traditional female muses.

Danh Vo (Vietnamese, born 1975)
Ma Ti Long, 2016

Danh Vo (Vietnamese, born 1975)
Ma Ti Long, 2016

Bamboo
13 × 8 ¼ × 8 ¼ inches (33 × 21 × 21 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Conceptual artist Danh Vo applies biographical references to question systems of immigration, citizenship, and identity. Made from bamboo that took over 10 years to grow, this birdcage was originally used to keep lovebirds and was discovered by the artist at a market in Guangzhou, China. The history of this found object illuminates the artist’s personal immigration story.

Sanford Biggers (American, born 1970)
Duchamp in the Congo, 1997

Sanford Biggers (American, born 1970)
Duchamp in the Congo, 1997

Wood, nails, found wheel, rope, metal pipe and paper
14 ½ x 28 x 8 ½ inches (36.8 x 71.1 x 21.6 centimeters)
© Sanford Biggers, Courtesy Marianne Boesky Gallery

Highlighting African aesthetics that were influential to Western modern artists, Sanford Biggers combines a found bicycle wheel, wood, nails, and metal piping that reference both Surrealist-artist Marcel Duchamp and African Power Figures in his assembled sculpture Duchamp in the Congo. Biggers works in a variety of art forms including sculpture, textile, performance, video and music.

Billie Zangewa (Malawian, born 1973)
On the Corner, 2010

Billie Zangewa (Malawian, born 1973)
On the Corner, 2010

Embroidered silk
22 7/16 x 29 1/8 inches (57 x 74 centimeters)
JPMorgan Chase Art Collection
© Billie Zangewa, Courtesy AFRONOVA GALLERY

Johannesburg-based artist Billie Zangewa’s embroidered technique is as inventive as the scenes she stitches about people, places, and personal narratives from a variety of international experiences. This vibrant tapestry faithfully depicts a neighborhood corner near the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York where the artist lived during her residency at the museum.

The JPMorgan Chase Art Program oversees more than 30,000 objects in 450 corporate offices around the globe. In addition, the program administers an active museum loan program, originates traveling exhibitions, provides educational programming for internal and external audiences, and supports the firm’s global philanthropic and sponsorship activities.

JPMorgan Chase & Co. believes that arts and culture are the lifeblood of vibrant communities. We support a range of programs and events that foster creativity, provide access to the arts to underserved audiences, promote self expression and celebrate diversity.